Charles tersolo

 
 

Thoughtful and inventive people tell others to visit a place, that they must see it; there is something inspiring about it, they will walk away a little larger. My works capture not only an image of these locales, but a heightened multi-experience. Through composition and a careful seven-layer process, using hand-mixed tubes including varnish and oil, I recreate highlights and colors such that when different combinations of light hit them, they change color and appearance similar to the original landscape and architecture.

Over 500 brushes are used to mix a prepared palette of 42 spectrum colors and pastel tones into delicate combinations that can no longer be named, slightly neutral tones that feed off of one another making a luminous whole. A brush is used just once to mix two or three colors, then set aside for cleaning, allowing unparalleled color clarity.

My current show is JUST GRAND: Venice, Paris, New York City, and the Grand Canyon (Canal, Palais/Boulevards, and Central Terminal). This collection explores elements that evoke the beauty of breadth and time. The subjects I work with are often endangered or historic, places people can visit but cannot own. These works give people freedom to live where they like and choose surroundings that stimulate them afterward. My synthetic impressionist series focuses and enlarges invented details and swirls them into an engaging whole.

In my Color Realist works, textures and tones are repainted seven times, creating a sense of space and light from the exact color choice of each stroke relating to others. I manipulate photo-studies into digital watercolors, then project them, creating original oils in a way similar to painting en plein air. I mix my own tubes using clear walnut oil, transparent varnish, and translucent whites. The visual effect of the overlapping color layers changes when viewed in different light, the way landscape and buildings vary with weather and time of day. My abstract paintings use the same seven-layer process, the shapes evolving as well as the colors.


TO INQUIRE OR PURCHASE, PLEASE CONTACT: 
BRIDGET McMAHON, GALLERY DIRECTOR
(text a screencap to) 408-909-5267 (909-JCOS)
(email) 
FINEART@JCOSPLACE.COM // (call) 408-888-1500


My current show is DEAD OR ALIVE: Death Valley, Redwoods National Park and the American Southwest. This landscaped-centered, Color-Realism collection explores the distance, openness,  and space of Death Valley, then contrasts it with the immediacy, life, and energy of Redwoods National and State parks. The subjects I work with are protected, but the art gives people freedom to live where they can and choose surroundings that enrich them afterward. My works capture not only an image of the locale, but a heightened experience. Through composition and a seven-layer process, using hand-mixed tubes, I create highlights and colors that change when differing light hits them. Though requiring up to a year of painting, this slow process captures the fluidity of the landscape. 

In my Color Realist works, textures and tones are repainted and reworked. Light moves and reflects through the subject, revealing space and form, as it changes the local color of the material world. I manipulate photo-studies into digital watercolors, then project them. These slide shows reveal color and light found on location, they make up one quarter of the total time invested in each work. The virtual plein-air experience of the slideshows allows me judge tones indoors, merging impressionist color with chiaroscuro.

A palette of 42 spectrum and pastel colors, along with 500 brushes, are used to mix delicate combination hues that can no longer be named, slightly neutral tones that feed off of one another making a luminous whole. A brush is used just once to mix two or three colors, then set aside for cleaning. While over 20 pigments are used, they are laid in at various stages throughout the work, lending the final image a color harmony that can be felt, even when a particular pigment is only used in just one area on the final surface. Pigments are used all over the surface make abstract beauty, but the order they are placed in allows subsequent layers to push them back, giving the feel of distance.

-CHARLES TERSOLO
DEAD OR ALIVE